perversetoamiracle:

still going to reblog this every goddamn time i see it

perversetoamiracle:

still going to reblog this every goddamn time i see it

(Reblogged from noctilucent-supercell)

bumpercity:

DAMN Star Trek looks good in the dark

Just played this table the other day. It moves FAST.

(Reblogged from bumpercity)

"Time to die."

I love this so much. Blade Runner has a special place in my heart because of Roy’s soliloquy. The story of how it was revised and edited and almost cut is fascinating. After David Peoples tweaked the speech into roughly the form we recognize from the film, Rutger Hauer cut it.

Hauer described this as “opera talk” and “hi-tech speech” with no bearing on the rest of the film, so he “put a knife in it” the night before filming, without Scott’s knowledge.[7] In interview with Dan Jolin, Hauer said that these final lines showed that Batty wanted to “make his mark on existence … the replicant in the final scene, by dying, shows Deckard what a real man is made of.”[8]

When Hauer performed the scene, the film crew applauded and some even cried. This was due to the power of the dying speech combined with coming to the end of an exhausting shoot. (source)

Hauer also improvised on the written speech during filming. The result is one of my all-time favorite movie moments.

(Source: brandyalexanders-moved)

(Reblogged from teal-deer)

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

PBS: Language as Prejudice - Myth #6: Women Talk Too Much (via misandry-mermaid)

This article aligns with results from studies from the Geena Davis Institute, that if women make up 17% of a group, men believe the gender split is equal. If women make up 33% of the group, men feel outnumbered by women. It’s disturbing.

a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

And that has serious consequences for the behavior of young women. This quote from a young woman is particularly telling:

if I pretend I don’t understand, it’s very different. The teacher is sympathetic and the boys are helpful. They really respond if they can show YOU how it is done, but there’s nothing but ‘aggro’ if you give any signs of showing THEM how it is done.

What is she learning in this situation? We need to work harder for fairness and equality.

(Reblogged from lustercandy)
(Reblogged from perilunesky)

femfreq:

denidimochka:

Inspired by Anita Sarkeesian’s Tropes vs. Women series. Its an amazing and poignant series of videos and if anyone hasn’t seen them I highly recommend them, you can check them out here feministfrequency.com Feminist Frequency is also a fantastic non profit so definitely support her if you get the chance!

Love it!

(Reblogged from gamingfeminism)

beardedbugle:

Women of the Revolution

I didn’t know how much I needed this post

(Source: imgonnaeditstuff)

(Reblogged from valkyrierisen)

sachithethief:

dont think ill ever get tired of tim schafer laying the smackdown on gamergate nerds

Tim Schafer keeps on demonstrating why he’s one of my heroes.

(Source: superhighschoolleveldoujinauthor)

(Reblogged from tbandido)
(Reblogged from gamingfeminism)
(Reblogged from closetedboggart)